Calmness in preparation but boldness in execution, this should be the watchword during the moments of crisis. – Veer Savarkar

Calmness in preparation but boldness in execution, this should be the watchword during the moments of crisis.

Veer Savarkar

Difficulties have the potential to bring out both the best and the worst in men. Men with a strong character and steely resolve turn turn disaster into opportunities to learn, improve and rebuild. On the other hand, weak men crumble under the unexpected calamity and leave behind a crippled generation incapable of making tough decisions.

Crisis demands a decisive head on cool shoulders. One must not panic under pressure. At the same time, one must have enough clarity of thought to be able to take timely decisions. Disasters often leave little time for one to react, so one moment can make all the difference between life and death, or success and failure. A good leader must know how to optimize the use of his resources. At a time when hopelessness is rampant, he needs to lead from the front and infuse hope in others. Rationality and logic often go out of the window in times of crisis; it is only the collective spirit of a group or the society at large that keeps them going in such moments.

Once the bugle has sounded and all hope of a honorable peace – and not some sort of Gandhian ‘peace’ purchased at the cost of dignity – has been ruled out, there is no further room for doubt or hesitation. Remember, one who dithers in times of an emergency is bound to end up on the losing side. In fact, one who is willing to act but begins planning only after the crisis has beckoned is also bound to fail big time. Only a bold approach backed by far-sighted preparations can help one emerge triumphant in such times.

Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, more popularly known as Veer Savarkar, was an Indian freedom fighter, activist, and writer. Known as the father of Hindutva, Savarkar once remarked: “Calmness in preparation but boldness in execution, this should be the watchword during the moments of crisis.”